Vegan Coconut Milk Dal Makhani


Visit the Indian Food Glossary for information on the ingredients in this recipe
Vegan Dal Makhani
Creamy, rich and fragrant dal makhani — literally "buttery lentils" — variations of this once humble north Indian street food staple have become signature dishes in fine Indian restaurants and homes across the world. Like other famous dal curries, dal makhani invites experimentation. The essentials of whole urad beans — easily found in any Indian grocer and also known as black gram — and red kidney beans, ginger, garam masala, and cream remain the same in all of these variations, but otherwise the dals are a canvas upon which to work your seasoning art.

Read this recipe »

Indian-Spiced Green Pea Soup


Visit the Indian Food Glossary for information on the ingredients in this recipe
Indian-Spiced Green Pea Soup
A nice split pea soup is comforting anytime of year, especially when the temperatures are cool. This Indian-style creamy pea soup includes green garden peas in addition to green and yellow split peas, and is ideal for lunch served with some fresh crusty bread, or as a starter or part of a larger dinner when a lightly spiced, earthy, thick and satisfying soup is in order.

Read this recipe »

Chana Paneer Masala


Visit the Indian Food Glossary for information on the ingredients in this recipe
Chana Paneer Masala
Originally a side dish that focused on paneer as the shining ingredient, I have revised the older recipe from way back in 2009 to make it more legume-centric. Thus, I have come up with a version of chana masala that includes shredded paneer along with mushrooms which are pan-fried near the end of the cooking time and then added to the dish for an unforgetable dish without too much fuss either.
Read this recipe »

Chana Palak (Spicy Chickpeas and Spinach)


Visit the Indian Food Glossary for information on the ingredients in this recipe
Chana Palak

I used to get confused about the difference between chana saag and chana palak. The common elements are chickpeas, split or whole, and leafy greens. As it turns out, palak means spinach, whereas saag can mean any leafy green, including spinach but also mustard greens, kale, fenugreek leaves or whatever suits your fancy.

No matter the greens you choose to include, this classic North Indian dish deserves to be served up often. The creaminess of silky spinach and coconut milk embraces the plump buttery chickpeas and the range of spices used to aromatically enhance the experience. It's a luxurious dish that is nonetheless not overly spicy nor too rich. Serve up with brown rice for a special earthy and nourishing meal, or with your favorite flat breads.

Read this recipe »